Catholic voters reminded of Church teaching on how to vote

Catholic voters reminded of Church teaching on how to vote

62 million registered voters will head to the polls in a few hours. 18,000 local and provincial officials will be elected, including legislators in the House of Representatives. Candidates are also vying for 12 seats in the Senate.

By Nirva’ana Ella Delacruz

May 12, 2019

MANILA

For many voters, even if the choice between this candidates seems no different from having to choose between the devil or the deep, blue sea, a lay speaker and apologist reminds the faithful about little-known Church teaching on how to vote.

“The faithful should take into heart what the Church teaches when choosing candidates. The teaching of the Church as elucidated by Benedict XVI, and by the CBCP in 2015, is clear: not to vote for candidates who are in favor of abortion, divorce, homosexual marriage, euthanasia and the death penalty,” said Pro-life Philippines Board member and apologist Carlos Palad in an exclusive interview with CBCP News.

“Voting for such candidates precisely because of their anti-life, anti-family views is absolutely not permitted,” he added.

Imperfect but winnable?

But because of what many perceive to be a lack of acceptable candidates, many Catholics choose to go with candidates who share the stand of the Church on at least several key issues.

“Every election sees a major division among committed Catholics on the best way to vote. Some vote for imperfect but winnable candidates in order to limit the damage that worse politicians will do. Others prefer to vote for morally-acceptable but long-shot candidates, as a matter of principle,” explained Palad.

According to him, the current state of Philippine politics “shows just how urgent it is to form a consciously Catholic electorate strong enough to put committed Catholic men and women into office.”

“This should be our task between elections,” he added.

Mid-term elections

Palad also noted that while the Church respects the freedom of voters, it also encourages the faithful to vote according to “well-formed consciences.”

“…This means listening to the Church when choosing candidates. Many Filipinos still vote as faithful Catholics, and no politician should disregard them,” he stressed.

As Filipinos head to the polls in a few hours, Palad reminded the faithful of the sanctity of the vote.

“Ask yourself if you can stand before God and tell Him who you will be voting for. If the very thought of doing this makes you feel ashamed about your choices, then perhaps you have made the wrong choices. Vote in a way that will give you a clean conscience,” said Palad.

62 million registered voters will head to the polls in a few hours. 18,000 local and provincial officials will be elected, including legislators in the House of Representatives. Candidates are also vying for 12 seats in the Senate.